Honing on Saint Patrick’s boyhood home (& then some more Huns)

I’m just having a wee break from the creation of The New Divan. But a poet’s mind never rests & I thought I’d return to the Saint Patrick mystery which I first approached this time last year. There’s a couple of new ideas I can add to the mix, the conclusion of which is that Saint Patrick was brought up in the area where Emmot Hall used to stand, a couple of miles outside Colne in East Lancashire, the Ravenna Cosmography’s Calunio.  A definitive Roman presence at Emmott was confirmed  by TT Whitaker, who writing in the year 1800 affirmed, ‘a large silver cup filled with {Roman coins} was turned up by the plough in the latter end of the 17th century.’

d6b60c3931914a6abe2bf7d789d1e83b3043f9fe

Both the Hymn of Fiacc & the the anonymous Latin ‘Life of Saint Patrick’ place his birthplace at Nemthur, the latter stating, ‘The holy Patrick was reared at Nemthur until he was a lad.‘ The name seems to derive from Nemeton, which means ‘sacred space’ in Brythonic, & thus to Emmott. Placing the young saint in this corner of East Lancashire a moment, let us read the following extracts from the anonymous life.

—————–

Now Patrick’s race was of the Britons of Dumbarton. Calpurn was his father’s name, a high priest was he. Otid (Potitus) was the name of his grandfather: he was a deacon. But Conchess was his mother’s name: daughter was she of Ochbas: of France was her race, that is, she was a sister of Martin’s.

—————–

This tells us that Patrick was born in the Kingdom of Strathclyde, which in that period stretched deep in to Lancashire from its capital at Dumbarton.

—————–

At Nemthur, now, was he born, and (as to) the flagstone on which he was born, when any one commits perjury thereunder, it sheds water as if it were bewailing the false declaration. If his oath is true the stone abides in its proper nature. Now when the holy Patrick was born, he was brought to be baptized to the blind flat-faced youth named Gornias. But Gornias had not water wherewith he could perform the baptism, so with the infant’s hand he made the sign of the cross over the earth, and a wellspring of water brake therefrom. Gornias put the water on his own face, and it healed him at once, and he understood the letters (of the alphabet), though he had never seen them before. Now here at one time God wrought a threefold miracle for Patrick, the wellspring of water from the earth, and his eyesight to the blind youth, and skill in reading aloud the order of baptism without knowing the letters beforehand. Thereafter Patrick was baptized.

—————–

p6201610
Hallown Well

 

Picture-189

Patrick’s birth should be connected to the Well of Hallown at Emmott – with baptisms taking place here as far back as AD 835 – which was known to have healing properties into the modern age, just as Gornias had his eyesight restored.  That, among the miracles attached to Patrick’s birth, one clearly stipulates a well is significant. An ancient holy well on the site supports the Nemeton to Emmott philochisp, & with miracles being attached to Saint Patrick own baptism,  no wonder it would be used as a baptism site centuries later.  Also on the site stood  a 7 foot high medieval cross-shaft, before it was moved to Colne churchyard in the 1960s from Emmott Hall, showing just how sacred a spot it was.

cross

At this point let us have a look at thesome other evidence that places Saint Patrick at Emmott, by looking at the other two  names we have for Patrick’s birthplace include Bannavem Tarburnaie & Ventre.

I, Patrick, a sinner, a most simple countryman, … had for my father the deacon Calpurnius, son of the late Potitus, a priest of the settlement of Bannavem Taburniae; he had a small villula nearby where I was taken captive. I was at that time about sixteen year of age… I was taken into captivity in Ireland with many thousands of people.  (Confessio)

This place, as I am informed beyond hesitation or doubt, is Ventre. (Milúch)

Now, look at the names of these three places all within a couple of miles of one another. ‘Tre’ & ‘Traw’ both mean farm.

N-EMT-hur – Emmott
VEN-tre – Winewall
Ven-TRE – Trawden

The Vinheath - Emmot Hall is near Winewall (top right hand cormner)
The Vinheath – Emmot Hall is near Winewall (top right hand cormner)

The Ven element leads to the Wendune & Vinheath placenames in the Brunanburh manifest,  Both the ‘dune’ & ‘heath’ elements of Wendune & Vinheath mean the same as banna: pinnacle, peak, mountain, bare hill, etc.. Near to Emmott is the Lancashire town of Burnley, which naturally leads to the the ‘burn’ element of Bannavem Tarburnaie. There is another Bannaventa in Britain, near the village of Norton in Northamptonshire, & is named thus in the mid-second century ‘Itinerary’ of Antonius Pius. What we may logically conclude is that the second Bannaventa came later, with an addition of ‘Burniae’ applied for the purpose of differentation.

The transition from the Brythonic ‘Burn’ to the Saxon ‘Brun’ would have taken place during the reign of Athelstan (926-939), confirmed by Layamon‘s, ‘
& the names of the towns in saxish speech…
 & in saxish he gan speak the names of the men,‘ & the Angol-Saxon Chronicles use of both name variants on the early 930s;

A.D. 931. This year died Frithstan… and Brynstan was blessed in his place.
A.D. 932. This year Burnstan was invested Bishop of Winchester

The antique metathesis between these two names occured several times in the early middle-ages. In the early 12th century, the Anglo-Norman chronicler Geoffrey Gaimar gave the names Bruneswerce & Burneweste for the battle of Brunanburh itself. Other examples include Saint Brynstan/Burnstan & Roger de Burne/Brun. But I digress to far once again.

methode%2Ftimes%2Fprod%2Fweb%2Fbin%2Fbe23918c-ce1b-11e7-a505-dffc08ac33de.jpg

That on the day of the Battle of Brunanburh the routed Vikings made the safety of the Irish Sea supports the kidnapping of Patrick by Irish pirates. Further exploration of the Brunanburh matrix allows to come full circle, so to speak, to Emmott, which the older locals in the area pronounce it as Ee-ah-mut.  It is significant that the borders of Strathclyde, Northumbria & Mercia all meet here, while a Roman road passes just a few miles to the North, giving Emmott easy access to the twin Viking capitals of York & Dublin. That Emmott has a famous baptising well connects with William Malmesbury’s description of the events at Eamoton, in which Athelstan takes a son of Constantine hostage; ‘Out of regard to this treaty, the king himself stood for the son of Constantine, who was ordered to be baptized, at the sacred font.’ Is this ‘sacred fon’t the Hallown? The ASC states that the kings ‘renounced all idolatry,’ just as the local pagans had done at the same well in 835.

A.D. 926. This year appeared fiery lights in the northern part of the firmament; and Sihtric departed; and King Athelstan took to the kingdom of Northumbria, and governed all the kings that were in this island: — First, Howel, King of West-Wales; and Constantine, King of the Scots; and Owen, King of Monmouth; and Aldred, the son of Eadulf, of Bamburgh. And with covenants and oaths they ratified their agreement in the place called Eamoton, on the fourth day before the ides of July; and renounced all idolatry, and afterwards returned in peace.

——————–

I’ve also discovered a key philochisp in the next step of Saint Patrick’s vita. Folkore states that that Niall of the Nine Hostages, a very ancient King of Ulster, was the man behind the capture of Patrick – known as ‘Succat’ – & now we can toss in more support. We begin with the Latin Life;

——–

Now this was the cause of Patrick’s coming to Ireland. Seven sons of Sechtmad, to wit, seven sons of the King of Britain, were in exile. They wrought rapine in the land of Britain, and Ulstermen were along with them, and so they brought Patrick in captivity to Ireland, and his two sisters Tigris and Lupait, and they sold Patrick to Míliucc maccu Buain, that is, to the King of Dalaraide.

————

indexThe name Sechtmad transchispers into Sachell Balb, a king of the Saxons given in an Irish text known as ‘The adventure of the sons of Eochaid Mugmedón.’ Sachell’s daughter, Cairenn Chasdub, is the mother of Niall. Thus the ‘Seven sons of Sechtmad’ would be Niall’s uncles, & it is through them that they invited the ‘Ulstermen’ on their raids on Britain. This presents a hyperbasis based on Sechtmad/Sachell being a Saxon king in Britain.  Indeed, Siggeat and Seabald appear in the Anglo-Saxon genealogies as father and son 9-10 generations before Aelle, the first king of Deira, in the North East of modern England, from AD 560.

Siggeat     
Seabald     
Saefugel
Swerta
Soemel
Westerfalca     
Westorwalcna
Wilgils     
Uxfrea
Yffe
Ælle

That Claudian wrote ‘The Orcades ran red with Saxon slaughter,’ in response to the activities of Theodosius in 398 now has more substance & we can at least present a solid hyperbasis that there was a Saxon occupation of the Orkney islands, whose king was Siggeat/Seabald, from whom descendents a greater kingdom was established in the 6th century. There’ll be more to it, obviously, but this what we can pin down for now – a toehold on the truth just as Siggeat made a toehold in the Orkneys.

Now, in an earlier post I showed how Woden & Cunnedda were Huns.  According to Snorri Sturluson, another of Woden’s sons was a certain, ‘Siggi, who ruled over what is now France.’ The Icelandic Völsunga saga states that Siggi was a Hun & tuis with some simple philochisps we can see how Siggeat/Sechtmad was a Hunnish ‘King of Britain’ at the very same time that his brother, Cunedda, was a Hunnish king of the Picts. This now presents double support for Bede’s placement of the Huns among the English gene-pool, when;

The Angles or Saxons, who now inhabit Britain… are still corruptly called ‘Garmans’ by the neighbouring nation of the Britons. Such are the Frisians, the Rugini, the Danes, the Huns, the Old Saxons, and the Boructuari

 But why is there no mention of the Huns settling in Britain? Well, I believe there is, & we can finally solve the Attacotti conundrum, the obscure tribe named as part of the Barbarian Conspiracy of 368.  According to Priscus, a 5th century Byzantine Historian, there existed a tribal group  called the Acatziri, who led a nomadic life on the Lower Volga, who were reported as having been Hunnic subjects before the time of Attila. Priscus relates anecdote in which two brothers, Denghizikh and Hernak were discussing making war on the Romans, but Priscus says that the the Acatziri, Saraguri, and the other Hunnic tribes, who lived by the Caucasus and the Caspian, were then engaged in a war with Persia; and that it would be folly to engage in two wars at once.

Jordanes located the Acatziri to the south of the Aesti (Balts) — roughly the same region as the Agathyrsi of Transylvania — describing them as “a very brave tribe ignorant of agriculture, who subsist on their flocks and by hunting,” which resonates with Ammianus Marcellinus’ description of the Attacotti  as ‘a warlike race of men.’ The Acatziri were a main force of the Attila’s army in 448, whose chieftan was Karadach/Curidachus, a name which clearly contains the Ceredic/Wradech shared by the early British kings including Cunedda’s own son.  Also named Ceretic was the Vortigern’ s translator, employed in his negotiations with Henghist, whose descendancy from Woden also indicates he was Hunnish.

My final hypothesis, then, is that the Acatziri were used by the Huns to cement their 4th century conquests within Britain…

…& of course, Saint Patrick was from near Burnley

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>